First Month, First Lesson

I started my job at LeadUp exactly four weeks ago. During that time, I’ve learned a ton. But most of all, I’ve learned that there is so much out there that I have yet to learn…stay with me here.

This idea comes from a story a great mentor once shared–I’m going to call it “The Circle Principle.” Imagine you draw a circle in the middle of a white board. Everything inside that circle represents what you know, and everything outside of the circle represents all of the knowledge and wisdom in the world that you don’t know. As you gain more knowledge, your circle grows, absorbing more and more from the surrounding empty space on the board. But as your circle expands, so does its circumference. Therefore, you are touching more of the “unknowns;” you “know” more that isn’t know. Essentially, the more you know, the more aware you are of everything you do not know.

Four weeks ago, I stepped into an apartment on the beltline in Atlanta, but I also walked right out of my existing circle and into the blank space on the board–attempting to stay above water as I waded through all that I didn’t know.

At first, it very overwhelming. With no sales background whatsoever, I needed to learn the process and the game in a matter of days. Thankfully, the start-up culture is a fast-paced one, and I listened and observed until I could safely float. Every day I come in, I learn more, which builds my ability to navigate everything on my own.

Over the next few weeks, I’m going to take you through a few of the things that have found new residence inside my circle on the whiteboard. The first, and maybe one of the most important, is this: getting to the point.

My job title is the “LeadUp Content Strategist,” meaning that my main duty is to create email campaigns for our clients to send out to cold prospects in the hopes that one–or preferably many–will bite.

That means that I need to be concise and purposeful with every word I choose to place on someone’s screen. Because in all honesty, each of those words represents a millisecond I have taken from that person’s day. They might not need what I am offering and they definitely do not owe me any of their time. Therefore, it is essential that I use their time wisely.

Even so, it’s very hard for me as a writer to resist crafting perfectly-worded and clever emails that I spend hours revising. I want to make my words perfect, even if someone is only going to spend two seconds on them before sending them to the trash bin.  

But those types of emails, the ones that are laboriously crafted to appear conversational, don’t work. Trust me. A better strategy–strap in, this one is pretty crazy–is to only give yourself roughly 30 minutes to write an email chain….

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I know, I know, it’s crazy. But don’t look at me like that, anonymous reader! You’re scaring me.  

For my job, my time is much better spent getting to know the clients I am representing, rather than laboring over the placement of words and commas in the messages that represent them. Once I know the client, I can portray their key messages with ease and swiftness.

So I’ve got my first priority: getting to know the company I’m representing. The very close second to that priority is getting to know the people I will be reaching out to. But when you’re sending emails to around 800 people/month/client, that is nearly impossible–except that it isn’t.

Rather than learn every detail about Sue from HR’s life, I am going to spend a significant amount of time learning what HR professionals care about. What motivates them? What common struggles do they have? What humor and tone will they identify with? Once I know that information as well as I know the company I am representing, then I should only need 30 minutes to write a few very straight-forward emails that will show Sue that I can help her with this really great product/service. Because meanwhile, this is what Sue is thinking:

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Which brings me to my next point (thanks for the handoff, Sue): prioritizing information. Choosing which points are the most important to hit and presenting them so that they are easily digestible is no simple task. Thankfully, there is another lesson I’ve gained from years of writing (s/o to my mentor once again for giving me this wisdom) that always helps to put what is most important into perspective. It is a very simple principle that, quite honestly, demonstrated to me why I should take this job in the first place. I knew I could be successful in my role because I have the following knowledge:

To make the audience the hero of the story.

With that in mind, the sales process completely changes. I would tell you all about it now, but I want to keep you in suspense for next week where I will delve much deeper into this principle. For now, congratulations! You made it to the end of my first blog post. And I’ve made it through my first month of work. Let’s celebrate together by continuing this blog reader-writer relationship for a little while longer :). Comment below and maybe we can expand each other’s Circle of Knowledge by sharing ideas.

-Jessie